Getting technique feedback from a coach on deck is a huge benefit of swimming with a team. But, what about when you’re working through a MySwimPro Training Plan or WOD on your own?
How do you check your form without a coach?

It’s not as simple to know if you’re practicing the right form if you train on your own—but it’s still crucial that you do! Proper stroke technique can make or break your training goals. So, it’s important that you know how to maintain proper form on your own. Here are some tips to improve:

Film Yourself

The best swimmers in the world continuously analyze their stroke technique and refine their training. Even if you train on your own, you can film yourself with your smartphone above or below the water to see what you’re doing.

Small adjustments in stroke technique can improve stroke efficiency and overall swimming velocity to reach optimal performance. In swimming, efficiency is everything. If you’re interested in having your stroke analyzed by our team visit our analysis service to get started today!
Get Stroke Analysis

Use Data

What gets measured gets improved!
Two of the best metrics you can use to evaluate stroke technique is SWOLF and Stroke Count. A really good indicator of stroke efficiency is the number of strokes you take per length. The less strokes you take, the more efficient you are per stroke. While you won’t be able to refine minor details off of stroke count, you can focus on this metric to make sure you’re maintaining stroke integrity over time.

Related: What is SWOLF?
SWOLF is a fantastic metric to use because it’s independent of pool length and stroke type. Each stroke has a unique SWOLF score and this is something that you should look at improving over time. You’ll feel when your stroke breaks down from fatigue, so too will your SWOLF score.

Using data to help you understand your swimming performance is one of the most efficient ways to help you improve in the water. With advances in wearable technology, the most important metrics can be tracked automatically and used to your advantage. Below is a great Test Set that can be used to benchmark your SWOLF Score.

Read: SWOLF Test Set Workout

Watch Yourself Swim

A swim mirror allows you to improve your swim strokes in real-time by seeing your technique while you practice. Because it can be difficult it is to make adjustments to your swim stroke based solely off of watching a video or even your coach’s advice. A swim mirror allows you to see your movements so you can improve your technique right on the spot.

Swimming with poor technique increases your risk of injury and doesn’t allow you to maximize your efficiency in the water. A technique analysis from our team will allow you to see where you can improve and what drills you can do to swim more efficiently.
Get a Technique Analysis here.
Learn more about MySwimPro Analytics here.
Happy Swimming!
Start 7-Day Free Trial

Share.

2 Comments

  1. Thanks! This is super helpful, because who has a coach around all the time? 🤷🏻‍♂️😁
    Here’s another one: Familiarize yourself with your body. This could be through technical yoga (Anusara, Iyengar or Embodied Flow) or movement studies such as Body-Mind-Centering. Knowing my body has helped me tremendously to get a feel for movement and execution. It will, of course, take time to ger to know your body in detail. Not executing technique well is related to which muscles you use/not use. Knowing your options will help.
    Another one: Ask other (good) swimmers for feedback. Can be a lot easier than setting up cameras and mirrors and also you get to know other people in the pool.
    Finally: watch other (good) swimmers and imagine you‘re doing what they‘re doing. Your body will pick up the movement more easily when you see someone else do it (in performance psychology it’s called „vicarious experience“).
    Happy swimming!!
    Clemens

  2. I feel like giving up but I won’t. I’m extremely disheartened. I tried and tried but I can’t seem to be swimming freestyle faster. I can’t get the strokes reduced per lap. I do have a coach twice a week, I swim on my own twice a week and I try to swim faster to get use to it. I have other squad members that improved way faster than me which is baffling because they put the same amount of effort like me. We are not far from the same age or height anyways.

Leave A Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.